Holiday Lodges with hot tubs

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Wakes Hall Lodges

Wakes Hall Lodges

Unwind in the world famous tranquil beauty of the Colne Valley, north Essex in the privacy of your own private, self-catered holiday lodge complete with the ultimate in luxury: your own hot tub Jacuzzi. Tucked away on your own private veranda your own private elite hot tub offers both seclusion and a view of the delightful countryside. Treat yourself to a glass of champagne, soothe your muscles, lay back and relax in style. Fast to heat and with multiple settings you can make your stay as soothing or as steamy as you like.

Wakes Hall Lodges

Wakes Hall Lodges

Surrounded by 500 acres of private country land. Wakes Hall Lodges offer the ultimate place to escape the city or your hectic lives. Our prestigious self-catered accommodation is the perfect place for a couple or family to spend some quality time together. Our eco-friendly state of the art lodges have recently been built and boast the latest technology as well as high-speed satellite Wi-Fi, a superb quality sound system a superb, fully-equipped kitchen. Our master en-suites have a free standing bath and walk-in waterfall showers. Second bedroom en-suites have a walk-in waterfall shower. The super king sized beds ensure absolute comfort and the hi-tech, super insulated build not only means that your lodge is carbon neutral but also means that you will be lovely and warm throughout your stay.

Wakes Hall Lodges

Wakes Hall Lodges

Nature lovers will have a wonderful time taking in the stunning flora and fauna of the delightful countryside. As well as a stunning two acre lake and there are an endless number of woodland walks to explore including the neighbouring willow woodland where the trees are farmed to make cricket bats. Visitors often enjoy a short amble to the local village where there is a shop and post office and a picturesque pub beside the river Colne that serves locally brewed beer. Local beauty salons provide a full range of services for visitors to the lodges and for those looking for an extra special treat we can arrange for a fully trained chef to serve up a delectable feast from the comfort of your lodge.

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Newmarket Racecourse

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Horse racing, Newmarket, by Anonymous Account

Horse racing, Newmarket, by Anonymous Account

Newmarket Racecourse is only an hour’s drive from Wakes Hall Lodges. The racecourse is a thoroughbred horse racing venue in the town of Newmarket, Suffolk. Newmarket is often referred to as the headquarters of British horseracing and is home to the largest cluster of training yards in the country. Many key horse racing organisations, including Tattersalls, the National Horseracing Museum and the National Stud. The racecourse hosts two of the country’s five Classic Races – the 1,000 Guineas and 2,000 Guineas, and numerous other Group races. In total, it hosts nine of British racing’s 32 annual Group 1 races.

Newmarket Racecourse, by andrew_stawar

Newmarket Racecourse, by andrew_stawar

As well as horse racing fixtures, there are a variety of other events held at the racecourse. This year concerts from artists such as James Blunt,  Tom Jones, Wet Wet Wet and The Beach Boys, are happening along with themed family day.

James Blunt, by Drake LeLane

James Blunt, by Drake LeLane

The British Classic Races that are held at Newmarket are the 2,000 Guineas Stakes (first run in 1809) and the 1,000 Guineas Stakes (first run in 1814). Both are held in late April/early May and are run over a distance of one mile. The British Classics are restricted to three-year-old horses and traditionally represent the pinnacle of achievement for racehorses against their own age group. Victory in any classic marks a horse as amongst the very best of a generation. Victory in two or even three of the series (a rare feat known as the English Triple Crown) marks a horse as truly exceptional.

The National Horseracing Museum is well worth a visit. It occupies part of the buildings that were known as the Subscription Rooms, where in the middle of the nineteenth century, the betting men would meet after racing. Now it contains items of historic and scientific interest connected with horseracing.

Flatford Mill – location for Constable’s The Hay Wain

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Flatford Mill - inspiration for Constable's The Hay Wain, by Jim Linwood

Flatford Mill – inspiration for Constable’s The Hay Wain, by Jim Linwood

Flatford is the home of Willy Lot’s cottage which is the building that features in John Constable’s masterpiece ‘The Hay Wain’. The River Stour, which in the picture has three horses pulling a hay wain across it, forms the border of two counties, the left bank is in Suffolk and the landscape on the right bank is in Essex.

John Constable (11 June 1776 – 31 March 1837) was an English Romantic painter. He was born in Suffolk, and is known principally for painting landscapes of the area surrounding his home, which he invested with an intensity of affection. “I should paint my own places best”, he wrote to his friend John Fisher in 1821, “painting is but another word for feeling”.

The Hay Wain (painted in 1821) is one of his most famous paintings. Constable first made a number of open-air sketches of parts of the scene, then created the final piece in his studio in London. The painting now hangs in The National Gallery in London and is regarded as “Constable’s most famous image”[1] and one of the greatest and most popular English paintings.

Flatford Mill by Karen Roe

Flatford Mill by Karen Roe

Willy Lot’s cottage is now a Grade 1, listed building owned by the National Trust, along with several other buildings in Flatford. The main National Trust visitor information centre is housed in Bridge Cottage (which is 200 metres from Hay Wain view), which contains an exhibition about Constable and a riverside Tearoom.

It is all within an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) with numerous footpaths and walking trails through great walking countryside so you can take the family out, walk the dog or simply step back in time and absorb the places Constable knew and loved.

Snapes Maltings

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Snapes Maltings, by doeth

Snapes Maltings, by doeth

Snapes Maltings is an arts complex on the banks of the River Alde at Snape, Suffolk, U.K. It is best known for its concert hall, which is one of the main sites of the annual Aldeburgh Festival.

The original purpose of the Maltings was the malting of barley for the brewing of beer; local barley, once malted, was sent from here to London and exported to mainland Europe. Today a collection of shops, galleries, restaurants and the Concert Hall fill the old buildings. The Alde Estuary is known for wildlife and river trips.

Benjamin Britten - A Ceremony Of Carols, by Piano Piano!

Benjamin Britten – A Ceremony Of Carols, by Piano Piano!

The composer Benjamin Britten along with the singer Peter Pears founded the Aldeburgh Festival in 1948. At first the Festival used local halls and churches but in 1967, Britten and Pears created a permanent home at Snape, five miles from Aldeburgh, by converting the Victorian maltings into an 832-seat venue. Within five years Britten and Pears had reclaimed more buildings on the site to establish a centre for talented young musicians.

67th Aldeburgh Festival

67th Aldeburgh Festival

This year’s Aldeburgh Festival runs from 13 to 29 June. The centrepiece of  2014 is a rare new production of  Britten’s pacifist opera, Owen Wingrave , with four performances (13, 15, 16, 18 June), a screening of the original BBC TV production (16 June) filmed at Snape in 1970, and a Study Day (17 June).

Other highlights include a Chamber Orchestra of Europe residency, a feature on composer Tristan MurailAn Aldeburgh Musicircus, performers including the Arcanto QuartetBBC Symphony OrchestraIan Bostridge, theCBSO and Thomas AdèsRichard Goode, the Monteverdi Choir and John Eliot GardinerMark Padmore and Ryan WigglesworthKlangforum Wien, and Masaaki Suzuki, plus our visual art show SNAP and the Festival’s naughty little sister, The Pumphouse.

Concerts and performances run at Snapes Maltings throughout the year.

Snapes Maltings also hosts the Aldeburgh Food and Drink Festival every year, with this year’s running over the weekend of 27th and 28th September 2014.

Lavenham and Mersea Island

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Lavenham

Lavenham Village, by Martin Pettitt

Lavenham Village, by Martin Pettitt

Lavenham in Suffolk is an ancient wool town, in the reign of Henry VIII it was ranked as the fourteenth wealthiest town in England.

The appearance of the town has changed little over the years: half-timbered crooked houses lean impossibly over the narrow streets, while the magnificent Swan Hotel makes a striking feature on the High Street. The picturesque Market Place is home to the famous National Trust Lavenham Guildhall, Little Hall, as well as a host of shops, restaurants and the Tourist Information Centre.

Lavenham High Street, by Peter2010

Lavenham High Street, by Peter2010

Lavenham has been described as the “finest medieval town in England” and has more than 300  buildings listed as being of architectural and historical interest. Despite being steeped in history, the town also has art galleries, independent lifestyle shops and boutiques, fine dining restaurants, pubs and cafes.

Mersea Island

Mersea Island, by say_cheddar

Mersea Island, by say_cheddar

Mersea Island is the most easterly inhabited island in the United Kingdom located off the coast of Essex, to the south-east of Colchester.
The island is joined to the mainland by a causeway known as The Strood. This carries the Mersea–Colchester road which is often covered at high tides and especially during spring tides. There are two main settlements on the island; the small town of West Mersea and the village of East Mersea. This is also a small hamlet at Barrow Hill to the north of West Mersea.
The main industries on Mersea are farming, fishing (including oyster gathering), and servicing the leisure boating industry.

Mersea Island oyster, by Abi Skipp

Mersea Island oyster, by Abi Skipp

The home of the famous Mersea Oysters, Mersea Island is a fantastic place to enjoy fresh seafood, go crabbing or go sailing. The most iconic restaurant is ‘The Company Shed’ which is renowned for its delicious, fresh seafood in an unpretentious setting – literally a shed! It has won rave reviews from The Observer that say ‘there is no better place to be stranded’. Take your own bread and wine and if there is an ‘r’ in the month you’ll be able to sample the oysters alongside crab, lobsters and mussels.

Colchester

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Colchester's ancient Tudor houses, by atomicpuppy68

Colchester’s ancient Tudor houses, by atomicpuppy68

Colchester is the oldest recorded Roman town in Britain, and has been claimed to be the oldest town in Britain. It was for a time the capital of Roman Britain. Pliny the Elder (who died in AD 79),  a Roman author, naturalist, and natural philosopher, as well as naval and army commander of the early Roman Empire, and personal friend of the emperor Vespasian, wrote about Colchester.

Before the Roman conquest of Britain it was already a centre of Celtic power for Cunobelin – known to Shakespeare as Cymbeline – king of the Catuvellauni, who minted coins there. Its Celtic name, Camulodunon, means ‘the fortress of [the war god] Camulos‘.

Soon after the Roman conquest of Britain in AD 43, a Roman legionary fortress was established. Camulodunum served as a provincial Roman capital of Britain, but was attacked and destroyed during Boudica‘s rebellion in AD 61. Sometime after the destruction, London became the capital of the province of Britannia. Colchester’s town walls c. 3,000 yd. long were built c.65–80 A.D. when the Roman town was rebuilt after the Boudicca rebellion. In 2004, Colchester Archaeological Trust discovered the remains of a Roman Circus (chariot race track) underneath the Garrison in Colchester, a unique find in Britain.

Reconstructed Roman helmet from the sacking of Colchester, by Ben Sutherland

Reconstructed Roman helmet from the sacking of Colchester, by Ben Sutherland

Medieval Colchester’s main landmark is Colchester Castle, which is an 11th-century Norman keep, and built on top of the vaults of the old Roman temple.

Humpty Dumpty

Colchester is also the most widely credited source of the rhyme Humpty Dumpty. During the siege of Colchester in the Civil War, a Royalist sniper known as One-Eyed Thompson sat in the belfry of the church of St Mary-at-the-Walls (Humpty Dumpty sat on the wall) and was given the nickname Humpty Dumpty, most likely because of his size, Humpty Dumpty being a common insult for the overweight. Thompson was shot down (Humpty Dumpty had a great fall) and, shortly after, the town was lost to the Parliamentarians (all the king’s horses and all the king’s men / couldn’t put Humpty together again.) Another version says that Humpty Dumpty was a cannon on the top of the church.

Colchester Zoo

Mandrill at Colchester Zoo, by wwarby

Mandrill at Colchester Zoo, by wwarby

Colchester Zoo is one of Europe’s finest zoos. It has recently celebrated its 50th birthday. The Zoo has a range of different exotic environments that replicate the natural habitats of the animals they host. In the 60 acre site you can enjoy the wonders of 260 different species of animals. Be enthralled by Lions, Tigers, Elephants, Penguins, Rhino, Monkeys, Giraffes and Orangutan.

Ramson Lodge

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Ramson Lodge, Wakes Hall Lodges, Essex

Ramson Lodge, Wakes Hall Lodges, Essex

Ramson Lodge is one of five lodges which are landscaped into the most secluded part of Wakes Hall Farm in the breathtaking Colne Valley on the Essex/Suffolk border. Also on the same site are Brook Lodge (two guests) and Endymion Lodge (four guests). Each of these lodges boasts a veranda from which you can take in the sumptuous views of the beautiful open countryside in which you are nestled. Surrounded by 500 acres of private land.

For more information visit: https://www.ruralretreats.co.uk/cottage/EX005